Abstracts: Vol.1 No. 1 2011 ISSN 2217-5237

A River Basin Management Plan for the Danube River

Philip Weller and Igor Liska
International Commission for the Protection of the Danube River, Vienna International Centre, D0412,
Wagramer Strasse 5, A-1220 Vienna, Austria, e-Mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Abstract

In 2000, the EU Water Framework Directive (WFD) fundamentally changed the basis for water management in Europe. One of the central elements of the new legislation is the requirement to manage  waters in hydrologic river basins, formalised in River Basin Management Plans. In the case of the Danube River Basin, such a plan was developed within the framework of the International Commission for  the Protection of the Danube River (ICPDR) until 2009.
In this article, we give an overview on the underlying WFD and highlight the most important aspects of the Danube River Basin Management Plan.  The Plan focuses on four main transboundary problems, called Significant Water Management Issues: pollution by organic substances, pollution by nutrients, pollution by hazardous substances and  hydromorphological alterations, or changes to the natural character and structure of the water body.
We provide an overview on relevant legislation beyond the WFD, the political backing that the ICPDR  relies on and on supplementary projects dealing with fish migration, the Joint Danube Survey or Urban Waste Water Treatment. Finally, we conclude this article with a prospect on increased intersectoral  endeavours that will set the stage for the next River Basin Management Plan, which is due in 2015.


Keywords: Danube River Basin; ICPDR; River Basin Management Plan; Water Framework Directive

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Global Change and its Impact on Water Resources: the Role of UNESCO’s International Hydrological Programme

Siegfried Demuth1 and Biljana Radojevic2

1 Head, Hydrological Processes and Climate Section, Division on Water Sciences, Natural Sciences Sector, UNESCO, 1. Rue Miollis 75732 Paris cedex 15, SP France, e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
2 Natural Science Sector, UNESCO, e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Abstract

Global change is affecting water resources significantly in different parts of the world. Changes in flow regimes combined with changes in precipitation timing and intensity will increase human vulnerability regionally. Livelihoods are affected as climate variability and water stress affect many sectors including agriculture, forestry, health conditions, food production, energy and tourism. The mission of the International Hydrological Programme (IHP) is to strengthen the scientific understanding of these impacts on water systems and to link scientific conclusions to policies for promoting sustainable management of water resources. The influences of global changes on water are playing a significant role in the seventh phase of IHP (2008-2013), entitled “Water Dependencies: Systems under Stress and Societal Responses”. Many IHP programmes such as HELP, FRIEND, IFI, G-WADI, and water quality programme, ISI, the Eco-Hydrology programme, GRAPHIC, Urban Water Management programme, PCCP and the groundwater programme are dealing with global change issues. The scope of the research has also been expanded and covers a diverse range of topics, including low flows, floods, variability of regimes, modelling, tele-connection, process studies, sediment transport, climate change and variability, and land use impacts. The successful accomplishments of the programmes depend on the efficient interaction between its internal management and its external cooperation. This paper provides some insights into some of the programmes dealing with global change and tries to suggest a way forward for international programmes.

Key words: global change, urban water, hydro-hazards, flow regimes, eco-hydrology, water quality, groundwater, conflict solution, adaptation, sediments, climate change and variability.

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Assessment of micro-pollutants from a water supplier’s perspective

Heinz-Jürgen Brauch and Frank Sacher
DVGW-Technologiezentrum Wasser (TZW), Karlsruher Straße 84, 76139 Karlsruhe, Germany, e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it , This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Abstract

More and more man-made chemicals are found in the aquatic environment in very low concentrations. These “micro-pollutants” might endanger the usage of water resources, particularly for drinking water preparation. The issue of micro-pollutants is a major challenge for water suppliers as adequate ­­­­­­­information on the occurrence, fate and assessment of the respective chemicals is often missing. In this paper an approach for the assessment of these micro-pollutants is described that combines the results of monitoring activities and lab-scale experiments with general information on physical, chemical and biological properties of individual chemicals under investigation. The outcome should enable water suppliers to decide on different management options and to communicate the issue to consumers and the public in an appropriate manner.

Key Words: micro-pollutants, assessment, water supply, water treatment, benzotriazoles, isothiazolinones

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Natural Attenuation of Emerging Pharmaceuticals by Bank Filtration in Addressing Regional Groundwater Management Issues

Milan A. Dimkić1, Dušan. Đurić1, Miodrag Milovanović1, Mila Laušević2, Goran Jevtić1 and Anđelka Petković1

1 Jaroslav Cerni Institute for the Development of Water Resources, 80 Jaroslav Cerni St., 11223 Belgrade, Serbia; e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it , This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
2 University of Belgrade, Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Karnegijeva 4, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia; e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Abstract

Some two million inhabitants live in Serbia’s Province of Vojvodina. Drinking water supplies for this population rely on groundwater abstraction. Of a total of some 7m3/s of water, roughly 30% originates from alluvial sources and the remaining 70% from deep subartesian aquifers. The province is made up of three regions (Banat, Bačka and Srem). In a considerable portion of the territory, the use of deep aquifers is coupled with baseline quality and over-exploitation problems. There is no straightforward solution. It is being sought in the delivery of additional water from the Danube alluvion. Two abstraction methods are available: direct withdrawal of water from the Danube’s main stream, and bank filtration. Bank filtration would allow for natural purification of the Danube water within the alluvial aquifer. Among other things, this will reduce concentrations of total organic carbon and various micropollutants, such as emerging pharmaceuticals. The development of a regional water supply system for Banat and the delivery of bank-filtrated water from the Danube alluvion would provide a long-term solution for the drinking water supply in Banat. Bank filtration (or artificial recharge) is the method of choice in this case because of the effectiveness of natural filtration and the improved quality of abstracted groundwater. This approach, involving natural purification of water, has wider significance and can be followed in addressing drinking water supply issues in the entire Danube River Basin.

Keywords: bank filtration, groundwater, pharmaceuticals, regional source, Vojvodina

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Oligochaeta community of the main Serbian waterways

Ana Atanacković¹, Dunja Jakovčev-Todorović¹, Vladica Simić², Bojana Tubić¹, Božica Vasiljević¹, Zoran Gačić³ and Momir Paunović¹

¹ University of Belgrade, Institute for Biological Research “Sinisa Stankovic”, Despota Stefana 142, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia; e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
² University of Kragujevac, Institute of Biology and Ecology, Faculty of Science, Radoja Domanovica 12, 3400 Kragujevac, Serbia
³ Institute for Multidisciplinary Research, Kneza Viseslava 1, 11030 Belgrade, Serbia

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to present a checklist and the distribution of Oligochaeta in Serbia’s major rivers: the Danube, the Sava, and the Tisa. The data presented serve as principal inputs for the design of an effective biomonitoring system, as a part of routine monitoring of water status under the EU Water Framework Directive. The rivers under investigation flow through numerous industrial and urban centers and receive significant amounts of pollution. The effects of pollution and hydromorphological alterations are important for the distribution of Oligochaeta, which are one of the principal members of the macroinvertebrate community. A total of 52 taxa of aquatic worms from 32 genera, belonging to 9 families, have been recorded. Most of the observed species are typical of potamon-type rivers in the region, adapted to high and moderate organic loads. The recorded community is dominated by limnophylous and limno to rheophilous, as well as pelophylous, argillophylous and psammophylous taxa. Although the investigated river stretches are considered to be of similar water types, characterized as large lowland rivers, a certain differences within the Oligochaeta species composition has been identified.

Key words: Oligochaeta, biological quality elements, water status, watercourses, large rivers,

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Cobalt(III) Tetramethylenedithiocarbamate as a New Flotation Collector for Preconcentration and Separation of Lead Determinated by Zeeman ETAAS

Vangelica Enimiteva, Trajče Stafilov* and Katarina Čundeva

Institute of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Sts. Cyril and Methodius University, P.O. Box 162, MK-1000, Skopje, Macedonia; *e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Abstract

A fast method for the preconcentration of lead in fresh water samples using colloidal precipitate flotation is described. Co(III) tetramethylenedithiocarbamate, Co(TMDTC)3, was used as a flotation collector formed of Co(II) and TMDTC– anion. During the reaction, Co(II) oxidizes in Co(III) and as a product of the reaction green amorphous precipitate of Co(TMDTC)3 is obtained, which coprecipitates lead traces from the water matrix. A successful separation of lead was attained at the correct optimized pH of the system, mass of Co, amount of TMDTC–, type of tenside and other important experimental parameters. After flotation separation from the liquor, the solid sublate containing traces of lead was dissolved by nitric acid and the determination was performed by using Zeeman electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ZETAAS). The results of the ZETAAS analysis are validated with the method of standard additions and by the application of the method to the water reference material.

Key words: Lead, fresh water, flotation, cobalt(III) tetramethylenedithiocarbamate, ZETAAS

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